Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

JOANNA 1968 Screenprint on paper 50 x 70 cm Signed

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Lincoln Center 1966 Screen print with enamel inks on silver foil paper 101.6 x 76.2 cm Limited deluxe edition of 100 signed and numbered

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Lincoln Center 1966 Screen print with enamel inks on silver foil paper 101.6 x 76.2 cm PP 1/2 (printers proof, deluxe edition) Directly from the private collection of Steve Poleskie, owner of Chiron press and publisher of this artwork. Not for sale

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Reflections on Girl 1990 Lithograph on Somerset paper 45 1/8 x 54 7/8 inches / 114,6 x 139,3 cm Limited edition of 68

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

The River 1985 Lithograph on Arches 88 paper 40 1/8 x 55 ½ inches / 101,9 x 141 cm Limited edition of 60

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Forms in Space 1985 Screenprint on Rives BFK paper 52 x 35.75 inches / 132 × 90.8 cm Edition of 125 Signed and numbered on lower right

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Shipboard Girl 1965 Offset lithograph on white wove paper 27 3/16 x 20 1/4 inches / 69.1 x 51.4 cm Signed on lower right

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Two Apples 1983 Woodcut on handmade Iwano Kizuki Hosho paper 29.87 x 39.25 inches / 75.9 x 99.7 cm Edition of 60 Signed, dated and numbered on lower right

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

I love Liberty 1982 Screenprint in colours on Arches 88 paper 38.375 x 27.125 inches / 97.5 x 68.9 cm Edition of 250 Signed, dated and numbered on lower right

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Head from Expressionists Series 1980 Woodcut with embossing on Arches Cover paper 39 4/5 × 33 3/5 inches / 101.1 × 85.3 cm Edition of 50 Signed and numbered on lower right

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Reflections on Expressionist Painting 1990 Screenprint in encaustic wax and magna on paper 59,5 x 39,4 inches / 151,1 x 100,1 cm Edition of 60 Signed, dated and numbered on lower right

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Nude on the Beach, from Surrealist Series 1978 Lithograph on Arches 88 paper 25.8 x 24.5 inches / 65.5 x 62.2 cm Edition of 38 Signed, dated and numbered on lower right

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Crying Girl 1963 Offset lithograph in colours on wove paper 17 x 23 inches / 43.2 x 58.4 cm Edition approx. 300 Signed on lower right

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

La Sortie 1990 Wood cut in colours on museum board 205.7 x 148.9 cm Edition of 60

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Blue Floor 1990 Lithograph, woodcut, silkscreen on board 151.8 x 217.2 cm Edition of 60

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein

Mao 1971 Lithograph 70 x 50 cm Edition of 150

Roy Lichtenstein

 

Roy Lichtenstein was born in 1923 in New York, where he died in 1997. His work has been exhibited extensively worldwide. Recent retrospective surveys include “All About Art,” Louisiana Museum, Humelbaek (2003, traveled to Hayward Gallery, London; Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid; and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art through 2005); “Classic of the New,” Kunsthaus Bregenz (2005); and “Roy Lichtenstein: Meditations on Art,” Museo Triennale, Milan (2010, traveled to Museum Ludwig Cologne). “Roy Lichtenstein: A Retrospective” opened at the Art Institute of Chicago in May of 2012 and traveled to National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. and Tate Modern, London. It is currently on view through November 4, 2013 at Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris.

 

Roy Lichtenstein’s early appropriation of the aesthetics of American popular culture made him integral to the development of Pop art. A student of the work of Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró, and Paul Klee, Lichtenstein incorporated elements of contemporary art theory and popular print media into his painting. 

 

In 1961 he began to replicate the Benday dot system used in mass-circulation printed sources such as comics, newspapers, and billboards; this would become a signature element of his painting and sculpture. By mimicking this industrial method and appropriating images from high and low culture, his work realized a broader accessibility that had not yet been achieved in contemporary art. 

 

Some of his most recognizable series evolved from imagery drawn from popular culture: advertising images, war-time comics, and pin-up portraits, as well as traditional painting genres such as landscapes, still lifes, and interiors.